Liyab's Blog

Here are some images and texts used by those who wants RH Bill canned.

(retrieved at: http://www.wowbatangas.com/tag/rh-bill-philippines/)

The text in itself is politically incorrect. Yeah, let’s ask those congressmen!

(Retrieved at: http://2010presidentiables.wordpress.com/category/rh-bill-5043/)

They’re getting creative with name-calling.

(Retrieved at: http://faorani.tumblr.com/post/1243102485/skyeeline-what-could-be-the-effect-of-rh-bill)

Acronyms, very creative indeed.

(Retrieved at: http://couragephilippines.blogspot.com/2011/02/choosing-life-rejecting-rh-bill.html)

I don’t know what to say.

(Retrieved at: http://ascenttomtcarmel.blogspot.com/2010/11/congressional-debate-on-rh-bill.html)

Using a national icon such as Red Horse beer. Applause.

(inspired by the “DEAR PONDS” placard made by Clem Novales)

DEAR AXE,

HINDI PORKIT AMOY TSOKOLATE ANG ISANG LALAKI HAHABULIN KO NA. ISA PA HINDI PORKIT NAAMOY KO SYA NA MABANGO AT KAMING DALAWA LANG SA ELEVATOR makikipaghalikan nako sa kanya.

NAKAKABOBO commercials nyo.

DEAR MODESS, CHARMEE at WHISPER,

HINDI TOTOO NA MAY BABAENG NAGSUSUOT NG PUTING PANTALON KAPAG MAY MENSTRUATION si KIM CHIU lang yon. NAKAKATAWA KAYO, palagay nyo may magpapabuhat na babe sa lalaki sa batok nito kung MERON SYA? PAKA-TOTOO KAYO.

DEAR PH CARE,

BAKIT KAILANGAN LIPARIN ANG PALDA NG MODELS PAG NAGHUGAS? Ibig ba sabihin nito kaya kami NAGHUHUGAS para lang AMUYIN NYO VAGINA NAMIN? HA? Hygeine dapat ang ipromote hindi yung nakakapangakit na amoy, me natural musk yan no. Merun bang masculine wash? Wala naman diba?

DEAR GLUTATHIONE, PAPAYA SOAP at MOSBEAU,

OO, MAGANDA ANG PUTI INAAMIN KO. PERO HINDI DAPAT IPINIPILIT SA AMIN ANG KULAY NA HINDI NAMAN NATURAL SA MIN. Mas cool ang BROWN. HINDI PA MADUMIHIN neutral pa.

DEAR VICKY BELO,

KUNG MGA KATULAD DIN LANG NAMAN NI HAYDEN KHO ang magiging BF namin kung papagandahin mo kami WAG NA LANG. DI KO KAILANGAN NG LALAKING sa sobrang INSECURE AT EGOISTIC eh kailangan nya pang MAG-EXPLOIT ng mga BABAE para sa IKALALAKI NG “PAGKALALAKI“ nya. LOSER.

DEAR REDHORSE, COLT 45 at MATADOR,

HINDI PORKIT UMIINOM ANG ISANG LALAKI NG BEER O NG ALAK eh LALAPITAN NA SYA NG BABAE. ISA PA LALO na ikaw COLT 45 nakakagago yung pa-contest mo na makakasama ng ilang araw sa isang resort si KRISTINE REYES, MAGING MANGINGINOM PARA MAKASAMA ANG ISANG BABAE … PATHETIC. Isa pa PARA KAYONG NAGBEBENTA NG BABAE… PARA LANG MABILI ANG PRODUKTO NYO. Boo!

DEAR CEBU PACIFIC,

BAKIT KAILANGAN PASAYAWIN ANG MGA FLIGHT STEWARDESS NYO?

Marangal na trabaho ang pagiging stewardess sa pagkakataon na magkaroon ng problema sa himpapawid ang eroplano sila ang tinatakbuhan ng mga pasahero. HUWAG nyo sana silang PAGSAYAWIN PARA MAKAKUHA LAMANG ng mga MANONOOD AT MGA PASAHERO.

by: Pau Rampola

We are local and young women activists in various countries of the Pacific, gathered in Suva, Fiji on 6-9 September 2010 for the Regional Training and Consultation on Gender, Economic and Climate Justice that was convened by the Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN) and the Pacific Network on Globalization (PANG). The Pacific region is confronted by the onslaughts of market forces through processes of trade, financial and services liberalization, and the implication of environmental changes on food security, water scarcity, sea level rise and intrusion. These are causing major upheavals and chaos in our social relationships, communities and societies at large.

In this context, we need policies and programs that empower communities, families and individuals, rather then exposing us to market assault and the changes in climate that affect land, livelihoods, handicrafts, indigenous medicines, staple food, symbolic wealth and our caring social relationships that include women’s informal networks of mutual support.

While we are in solidarity with the struggle of people’s movements and nongovernmental organizations, a political response based on a feminist interlinkages perspective on gender, economic, and climate justice, is yet another way by which we can contribute to the development of an alternative paradigm of sustainable development in the Pacific.

Such a feminist approach utilizes concepts of social reproduction and women’s right over our bodies and sexualities as core principles in our political analyses and actions. By this we mean that care of individuals should not be bargained away by governments when they negotiate trade and environmental agreements like PACER PLUS, WTO, UNFCC, CBD, etc. In guaranteeing social reproduction, such as health, education, water, livelihoods, etc. the state must also protect and promote the right of women to control our bodies and our sexualities in all places -our homes, schools, communities, etc.This means putting in place a policy, legislative and program environment
that:
(a) gives justice to women who are physically and sexually abused and denied their sexual & reproductive health life & rights;
(b) provides equal access, control and ownership of resources of both land and the sea;
(c) ensures women’s meaningful participation in decision making in politics and citizen’s mobilizations;
(d) supports the empowerment and voices of Pacific women to confront aspects of our culture that are hampering our development and autonomy; and
(e) ends all forms of discrimination on the basis of ethnicity, class, gender identity, sexual orientation and abilities.

We will therefore adopt various strategies aimed at promoting a feminist inter-linkages analyses and activities aimed at: our organizations;
constituents and allies; and regional platforms facilitated through intergovernmental or social dialogues.

We also strongly commit to continue networking with each other as we continually strengthen and recreate a vibrant regional Pacific feminist women’s movement that engages in a politically interlinked way – locally, nationally, regionally and internationally.

Dated: 20 October 2010

This statement has been endorsed by:
Lice Cokanasiga, Pacific Network on Globalisation (PANG), Fiji;
Nerida-Ann Hubert, Nauru Youth Council, Nauru;
Josephine Kalsuak, SPC/RRRT, Vanuatu;
Rosa Koian, Bismarck Ramu Group, Papua New Guinea;
Eweata Maata, Kiribati;
Arieta Moceica, Pacific Conference of Churches (PCC); Fiji;
Reeti Onorio, School of Development Studies, USP, Kiribati;
Ender Rence, Solomon Islands Development Trust, Solomon Islands;
Lu’isa Samani, Women’s and Children’s Crisis Centre, Tonga;
Kairangi Samuela, Cook Islands Women’s Counselling Centre: Punanga
Taturu, Cook Islands;
Filomena Tuivanualevu, Fiji Women’s Rights Movement, Fiji;
Sainimere Veitata, Nesian350, Fiji.

The meaning of the word “feminism” is so much more than its definition. A lot of movements and theories exist, arise, and sometimes clash against each other in the world of feminism… There’s not a single school that I can totally identify with — that’s why I don’t feel confident in calling myself a feminist. What I know though is that, I know my capabilities and limitations as a woman. And I embrace them — without prejudice towards the opposite sex, and with a conditional lenience for the ignorant. I do not have a theory to back up my stand and my beliefs. Because mine is an “everyday feminism”. It is living everyday being gender fair. It is knowing that more than the battle of She vs. He, every individual is a person with a freedom to have choices to and to make decisions.

 

 

 

 

Lea Las Pinas

We welcome, yet again, a new chapter in this rather peculiar gathering of young women. We are not a formal group. We are bunch of activists, anarchists, feminists, academics, development practitioners and law students coming together (mostly with beer in hand) to talk about our issues. There’s no judgement but candor of young souls wishing to put meaning and sense to what it is to be a young woman.

Join us 🙂

To those who want to contribute articles and photos, please email us at nagliliyab@gmail.com 🙂

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